Home | Legals | Sitemap | KIT

“I know how you are feeling!" – State-of-the-art of integrating facial expression analysis via webcam into web pages

“I know how you are feeling!" – State-of-the-art of integrating facial expression analysis via webcam into web pages
Type:Bachelor Thesis
Supervisor:

Celina Friemel

Add on:

Status: Open

Emotions
Users' emotions play an important role when providing timely user assistance

What is it about?

Assisting the user in the right moments with the right advice can strongly enhance the customers’ shopping experience – offline as well as online. However, the invocation of user assistance online is still quite simple and not tailored to the user.

Sensing the users’ affective states (e.g. via facial expression analysis) during online shopping holds great potential for reacting to users’ needs to address this issue. However, the technology of analyzing users’ facial expressions via webcam and the integration of this into web pages is still in early stages.

Thesis Goals:

  • Overview and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of the integration possibilities of webcam-based facial recognition software to web pages (this could be a starting point)
  • Development and implementation of a prototype web page (with bootstrap) that is able to invoke user assistance based on the facial recognition software
  • Evaluation of your prototype

Skills required:

  • Interest in human-computer interaction with a focus on emotions
  • Motivation to find new solutions and bring reserach forward
  • Good programming skills
  • English skills

Getting Started:

  • Ekman, P. 1993. “Facial expression and emotion.,” American Psychologist, (48:4), pp. 384–392.
  • Ekman, P., Friesen, W., 1978." Unmasking the Face: A Guide to Recognizing Emotions from Facial Clues." Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
  • Klein, J., Moon, Y., and Picard, R. W. 2002. “This computer responds to user frustration: Theory, design, and results,” Interacting with Computers, (14:2), pp. 119–140.
  • Picard, R. W. 1997. “Affective Computing,” M.I.T Media Laboratory Perceptual Computing Section Technical Report No. 321, pp. 1–16.